2 v 2 exercises

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2 v 2 exercises

Post by Admin on Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:33 am

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Hello i have to put on a presentation on level 2 2v2 attacking what are the important things to coach in this? At the moment i have added crossovers and the key factors of this any more ideas? thanks.

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Re: 2 v 2 exercises

Post by Adam D on Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:34 am

I like to do a lot of 2v2 in practices. I'll outline a drill I use fairly regularly.

1 line of players starts in the centre circle. another behind the goal (usually this group is split with a line on each post)

the attacking pair begin on the edge of the centre circle. A1 sprints to the penalty arc and checks his run, A2 passes into his feet and A1 drops it back. Just a simple way to get the game going.

D1 and D2 set off as soon as A1 sets off, so they reach each other about the time A2 gets the ball back.

From there D1 and D2 decide who will press the ball. Let's assume D1 closes down the ball. We now have....

_______goal_______


_____________D2
_____________A1
___D1
___A2*

from here I want the attackers to create an opportunity to score. They have 5 options. Wall-Pass, 1st Fake, 2nd Fake, Cross-Over, Overlap.

All of these are great to coach together as they require the same starting set up, allow for improvisation and translate to a game well.

The trick to these moves is always the same thing. A1 has to push onto D2, if he stays alongside A2 then you don't get anywhere, just end up passing in front of the defense all day. But if A1 pushes up into the position shown above, you now have the staggered angle that creates so much potential.

_______goal_______


_____________D2
_____________A1
___D1
___A2*

The Wall-Pass, once A1 pushes up, it's a simple 1-2, A2 passes to A1 and then races around down the side of D1 to receive the return. (You can see that it's the angle that creates the space for this, if there was no staggering then it wouldn't be possible.

The 1st Fake is simply A2 faking the pass to A1, and then beating D1 himself and breaking for the space. A simple step over will suffice. (fake to pass with the outside of the right foot, stepover the ball and use the left foot to break down the outside)

The 2nd Fake is where A1 fakes. So A2 plays the pass, and goes for the return, bursting beyond D1. A1 pretends to return the ball but instead, rolls his body and goes down the right side of his man and shoots. Make sure to 'sell' the move with a drop of the shoulder.

The Overlap involves, A2 passing to A1, then looping around the front and then down the right of A1. A1 holds the ball up and rolls into the path of A2. The trick here is for A2 to run his man into D2.

The Cross-Over is a simple move designed to create space. A1 makes a diagonal run into the space behind D1, his man follows. This lines up the defenders vertically and opens up a channel for D2 to dribble into.

The major coaching points I cover are that A2 has to push on to his man. (the defense will naturally be staggered as the second defender needs to be in his correct position.) From there I teach each play separately and then let them go at it with the freedom to choose one of the 5 plays. It's an easy intervention to explain a proper use of the step-over (so often step-overs are used for no reason, here is a perfect time to use it correctly). It's also a good time to encourage attackers to back in to the defender and roll them. As well as the idea which kids just don't get of using runs to create space for other players. They are fine with finding space for themselves, but to draw the defender with them and open up an alley for a team mate just doesn't occur to them. I tell them to make a big deal of the fake run when performing the cross-over. don't just sneak into the space, because the defender won't follow you, point and ask for it in the space, brush past the defender who is more likely to follow a player he is already touch-tight with.

Anyway - I don't have the qualifications that you probably have. This might not be the kind of thing you need, but hopefully it helps. It's a really easy thing to run in practice. It's quite advanced though and only my better U16 ever put this into practice in games even though the brilliance of it is that it only requires 1 step. Push on to your man to create the angle.

good luck

Adam D
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